Bitcoin Mining: How Long Does It Take to Mine 1 Bitcoin?

Explore the complex process of Bitcoin mining, its evolution over time, costs, profitability forecast for 2024, and the impact of Bitcoin halving.

This article provides an in-depth understanding of Bitcoin mining. It covers key terms related to Bitcoin, the process of mining a block, how Bitcoin mining started, and the role of mining hardware and competition in the process.

It also discusses the computational power required for mining, cost considerations, the number of Bitcoins left to mine, and the profitability of Bitcoin mining in the future.

Before delving into the process of bitcoin mining, it is crucial to familiarize with some key terms related to Bitcoin as below:

  • Hash: An alphanumeric result of the SHA-256 algorithm, also a measure of a computer’s guessing capacity.
  • Block header: Metadata about a bitcoin block including:
  • Version: The version of the bitcoin-mining software.
  • Previous block hash: The hash of the last block.
  • Merkle root: A hash of individual transactions in the block.
  • Timestamp: The creation time of the block.
  • Target: A 256-bit number that the hash must meet.
  • Nonce: A value miners change with each hash attempt to meet the target.

The Process of Mining a Block

Mining a block in blockchain involves a complex process. When a transaction is made, the details are entered into a block on the blockchain, which is then put through a cryptographic algorithm, known as “hashing”. This generates a 64-digit hexadecimal number, or a hash.

Miners attempt to guess a number lower than the designated target hash by adding “nonces” to the hashed information. A nonce is a number used only once, and changing it alters the resulting hash.

The mining program continuously adjusts the nonce and rehashes the information until it generates a hash lower than the target. This process requires trillions of attempts by a network of miners.

Successfully mined blocks confirm transactions, contribute to the blockchain, and the difficulty of mining a block adjusts approximately every two weeks based on the number of participants.

What was Bitcoin Mining at the Beginning?

In the early stages of Bitcoin in 2009, the initial miners utilized standard multi-core CPUs for mining as it was the only available mining software at the time.

They were able to generate Bitcoins at a rate of 50 per block. Satoshi’s concept of “one CPU – one vote” was applicable since only CPUs were used for mining.

Individuals could earn up to $5 a day with a couple of computers with reasonable specifications. The mining difficulty was low at that time, making Bitcoin mining accessible to hobbyists and cryptocurrency enthusiasts.

Essentially, anyone with an interest in a crypto casino and some spare computational power could make a small profit by mining Bitcoin in their leisure time.

Bitcoin Core was the first official Bitcoin miner and it utilized CPUs for mining. As time went by, the first GPU miner was developed, significantly speeding up the mining process. As a result, GPU mining became more prevalent than CPU mining.

Mining Speed

The speed of mining Bitcoin is influenced by various factors, including computational power, competition, and hardware. Yet, the complexity of the hashing algorithm is designed to self-adjust and typically results in a block verification time of about 10 minutes.

Ideally, this means that mining a Bitcoin takes approximately 10 minutes. However, most mining scenarios are not ideal due to technological advancements.

Earlier, it was feasible to mine Bitcoin using a personal computer. But now, mining demands extensive electricity and hardware, which impacts the speed of mining. Consequently, if you’re mining independently, it could take longer than the ideal 10 minutes.

The Role of Mining Hardware and Competition

Mining hardware plays a critical role in Bitcoin mining. The equipment is necessary to solve complex cryptographic problems that secure the blockchain and process transactions.

As technology has advanced, CPUs, once capable of handling Bitcoin mining, have been replaced by more powerful devices such as ASIC machines. These machines are designed specifically for mining Bitcoin and are significantly more efficient and robust.

Bitcoin Mining: How Long Does It Take to Mine 1 Bitcoin?

The development of these modern mining rigs has exponentially increased the competition in Bitcoin mining. This is because the rigs expedite the Bitcoin mining process, making it difficult for solo miners with less powerful equipment to compete.

The ASIC machines used today are far more powerful and energy-efficient than the CPUs and GPUs that preceded them. They continually gain more hashing power as new, more advanced chips are developed and deployed, further intensifying the competition.

However, the cost of these powerful machines can be prohibitive, leading to a competitive landscape where only those willing to invest a significant amount can mine efficiently.

How Are Bitcoins Mined?

Bitcoins are mined through a process that involves the cryptographic hash algorithm known as “Secure Hash Algorithm 256 (SHA-256).” This algorithm transforms any line of text into a 256-bit (32-byte) hash value, converting words and sentences into fixed-length, uninterpretable, alphanumeric strings.

These strings serve a crucial role in bitcoin mining as they act as the digital signature for every bitcoin block and transaction recorded.

SHA-256 is specifically used to hash the block’s header and create bitcoin payment addresses. Other computers that can recognize hash algorithms then verify the resulting cryptographic string. The output from the original data will always be consistent.

The entire process of hashing is essentially an attempt to guess the target hash assigned to a block. It does this by combining the block’s contents with random values known as the nonce.

If the output doesn’t match the target hash, the process moves to the next computation. For a block to be accepted as valid, the final hash output, processed by the SHA-256 algorithm, must be less than or equal to the target hash.

How Much Does It Cost to Mine One Bitcoin?

The expense of mining a single Bitcoin varies, and according to CoinGecko, the average cost is roughly $70,291.24 at the moment. This cost depends on numerous factors, with the energy price in the mining region being a major consideration.

For instance, the cost can be influenced by your electricity rate and the type of mining machine you employ. Using the latest mining computers at home can result in high mining costs.

Several elements must be considered when calculating the cost of mining one Bitcoin. These include the mining hardware’s efficiency (in watts per terahash), the mining operation’s hash rate (in terahashes per second), and the total energy consumed over the time it takes to mine one Bitcoin.

However, a simple method involves using the average energy needed to mine one Bitcoin and then computing the cost based on the electricity rate. Here’s the formula:

  • At 10 cents per kWh:
    • Cost = 110,000 kWh × 0.10 $ per kWh
  • At 4.7 cents per kWh:
    • Cost = 110,000 kWh × 0.047 $ per kWh

Thus, the cost of mining one Bitcoin at an electricity rate of 10 cents per kWh is roughly $11,000, and at 4.7 cents per kWh, it’s about $5,170.

How Much Power Is Needed to Mine 1 Bitcoin a Day?

Estimating the power required to mine 1 Bitcoin per day, we can use a Bitcoin mining calculator. This suggests that around 502,000 TH/s of computing capacity is needed. This amounts to about 1,968.6 units of Bitmain Antminer S19 XP Hyd (255Th).

Bitcoin Mining: How Long Does It Take to Mine 1 Bitcoin?

Considering that each of these ASICs consumes 5,304W, the total power consumption for this setup would be approximately 10,441,600W (10.4416MW).

Mining metrics calculations are based on a network hash rate of 650,165,337,340 GH/s and a BTC-USD exchange rate of 1 BTC = $ 69,215.33, subject to fluctuation. The current block reward is 6.25 BTC, with an average block time of 587.4247 seconds as of this writing.

The cost of electricity is $0.12 per kWh. Future changes in block rewards and hash rates are not considered. These are estimations under current conditions.

How Long Does It Take to Mine 1 Bitcoin Using a PC?

Mining 1 Bitcoin using a PC would roughly take about 2 million years, assuming the system can achieve a mining speed of 500 MH/s in a Bitcoin mining pool with stable network conditions.

This is due to the average block generation time for Bitcoin being 10 minutes, and the current block reward standing at 6.25 BTC.

If you were to use a high-performance gaming computer for mining, and manage to achieve 500 MH/s, you could potentially earn 0.00000058 BTC per year under ideal circumstances.

However, with block rewards continually halving, and mining difficulty increasing, it’s practically impossible to mine 1 Bitcoin using a PC.

How Many Bitcoins Are Left to Mine?

Currently, the number of Bitcoins (BTC) left to be mined is around 1,321,700, suggesting that close to 19,6 million are already in circulation.

Bitcoin Mining: How Long Does It Take to Mine 1 Bitcoin?
Source: BitBo

What Happens After All the Bitcoins Have Been Mined?

When the cap of 21 million Bitcoin is hit, no new BTC will be issued, even if the number of available coins falls slightly short of this cap.

Nonetheless, the verification of Bitcoin transactions and their grouping into blocks will persist, with miners still receiving compensation primarily through transaction processing fees.

What happens to miners when Bitcoin reaches its maximum supply will hinge on how the cryptocurrency evolves.

If the Bitcoin blockchain is still processing a significant volume of transactions in 2140, miners could potentially sustain revenue through transaction fees.

Conversely, if Bitcoin is primarily being utilized as a value reserve rather than for everyday transactions, miners could maintain profitability by levying high fees to process large or high-value transactions.

Is Bitcoin Mining Profitable in 2024?

Bitcoin mining profitability in 2024 largely depends on a variety of factors including the cost of mining equipment, electricity costs, the price of Bitcoin, and mining difficulty.

Factors Affecting Bitcoin Mining Profitability in 2024

Miners compete against large outfits controlling vast capacities, over 100 exa-hashes per second, which dwarfs the typical graphic processing unit’s approximately 275 mega-hashes per second.

Profitability increases when joining a mining pool, as rewards are based on the contribution to the mining effort. However, consideration must also be given to the initial investment into ASICs, powerful Bitcoin mining equipment that can cost thousands of dollars.

Impact of ‘Bitcoin Halving’ Event on Mining Rewards

Moreover, Bitcoin mining rewards are set to decrease due to the upcoming ‘Bitcoin Halving’ event in April 2024, reducing the reward from 6.25 BTC to 3.125 BTC. This reduction could impact profitability, particularly if the price of Bitcoin does not increase accordingly.

At current prices, 6.25 BTC equates to approximately $433,400. Following the halving, if prices remain constant, the reward value would halve to around $216,700. Miners must then cover operational costs such as equipment, electricity, staff, and taxes from this amount.

Conclusion

In conclusion, Bitcoin mining is a complex process that involves solving cryptographic problems to secure the blockchain and process transactions. The time it takes to mine one Bitcoin greatly depends on a myriad of factors, including computational power, competition, and the type of mining equipment used.

With advancing technology and increased competition, mining Bitcoin has become less accessible to individual miners. Moreover, Bitcoin mining’s profitability in the future will hinge on several elements such as the cost of mining equipment, electricity costs, the price of Bitcoin, and mining difficulty.

Thus, potential miners should meticulously consider the return on investment before embarking on Bitcoin mining.

FAQs

1. How Long Does It Take to Mine 1 Bitcoin Using a Smartphone?

Mining Bitcoin using a smartphone is not feasible due to the high computational power required for Bitcoin mining. Even the most advanced smartphones don’t have the necessary computing power to compete with specialized mining equipment like ASICs.

Therefore, it would take an inordinately long time, potentially many years or even decades, to mine a single Bitcoin using a smartphone, if it’s even possible.

2. Why Do Bitcoins Need to Be Mined?

Bitcoins need to be mined for a number of reasons. Firstly, mining is the process by which new bitcoins are introduced into the circulating supply.

Secondly, mining is also the mechanism that secures the Bitcoin network. By solving complex mathematical problems, miners validate and record transactions on the Bitcoin blockchain, preventing double-spending and maintaining the integrity of the system.

3. Can You Mine for Bitcoins without the Right Equipment?

Yes, it is possible to mine bitcoins without investing in dedicated hardware through a process known as “cloud mining.” This method is an alternative for those who do not have their own mining infrastructure.

Cloud mining leverages a remote data center managed by a third-party mining facility. Users only need to rent a virtual server where they can install their mining software. They also have the option to buy a membership contract or share in a cloud-mining farm with others.

4. How Will Bitcoin Halving Affect Bitcoin Gains?

The Bitcoin halving event is expected to significantly impact Bitcoin gains. According to the Forbes Finance Council, this event will trigger a recalibration of Bitcoin prices. Two primary outcomes are predicted:

  • Some miners may choose to exit as the reward for Bitcoin mining will decrease by half.
  • Miners may decide to retain their Bitcoins, much like holding onto stocks, and wait for a favorable selling price.

Past halving events have elicited similar reactions from miners, and it’s anticipated that the upcoming halving will follow the same pattern.

The next halving event, expected in April 2024, will decrease the reward from 6.25 Bitcoin to 3.125 Bitcoin per mined block.

5. What Factors Bring Cryptos Down?

Factors such as political events, regulatory changes, economic policies, and global crises can significantly impact the value of cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin.

For instance, when China, a popular destination for Bitcoin mining due to its low electricity costs, banned the activity in 2019, Bitcoin’s price took a hit. This led many miners to relocate their operations to countries like Kazakhstan, which had ample energy resources.

Bitcoin Mining: How Long Does It Take to Mine 1 Bitcoin?

Explore the complex process of Bitcoin mining, its evolution over time, costs, profitability forecast for 2024, and the impact of Bitcoin halving.

This article provides an in-depth understanding of Bitcoin mining. It covers key terms related to Bitcoin, the process of mining a block, how Bitcoin mining started, and the role of mining hardware and competition in the process.

It also discusses the computational power required for mining, cost considerations, the number of Bitcoins left to mine, and the profitability of Bitcoin mining in the future.

Before delving into the process of bitcoin mining, it is crucial to familiarize with some key terms related to Bitcoin as below:

  • Hash: An alphanumeric result of the SHA-256 algorithm, also a measure of a computer’s guessing capacity.
  • Block header: Metadata about a bitcoin block including:
  • Version: The version of the bitcoin-mining software.
  • Previous block hash: The hash of the last block.
  • Merkle root: A hash of individual transactions in the block.
  • Timestamp: The creation time of the block.
  • Target: A 256-bit number that the hash must meet.
  • Nonce: A value miners change with each hash attempt to meet the target.

The Process of Mining a Block

Mining a block in blockchain involves a complex process. When a transaction is made, the details are entered into a block on the blockchain, which is then put through a cryptographic algorithm, known as “hashing”. This generates a 64-digit hexadecimal number, or a hash.

Miners attempt to guess a number lower than the designated target hash by adding “nonces” to the hashed information. A nonce is a number used only once, and changing it alters the resulting hash.

The mining program continuously adjusts the nonce and rehashes the information until it generates a hash lower than the target. This process requires trillions of attempts by a network of miners.

Successfully mined blocks confirm transactions, contribute to the blockchain, and the difficulty of mining a block adjusts approximately every two weeks based on the number of participants.

What was Bitcoin Mining at the Beginning?

In the early stages of Bitcoin in 2009, the initial miners utilized standard multi-core CPUs for mining as it was the only available mining software at the time.

They were able to generate Bitcoins at a rate of 50 per block. Satoshi’s concept of “one CPU – one vote” was applicable since only CPUs were used for mining.

Individuals could earn up to $5 a day with a couple of computers with reasonable specifications. The mining difficulty was low at that time, making Bitcoin mining accessible to hobbyists and cryptocurrency enthusiasts.

Essentially, anyone with an interest in a crypto casino and some spare computational power could make a small profit by mining Bitcoin in their leisure time.

Bitcoin Core was the first official Bitcoin miner and it utilized CPUs for mining. As time went by, the first GPU miner was developed, significantly speeding up the mining process. As a result, GPU mining became more prevalent than CPU mining.

Mining Speed

The speed of mining Bitcoin is influenced by various factors, including computational power, competition, and hardware. Yet, the complexity of the hashing algorithm is designed to self-adjust and typically results in a block verification time of about 10 minutes.

Ideally, this means that mining a Bitcoin takes approximately 10 minutes. However, most mining scenarios are not ideal due to technological advancements.

Earlier, it was feasible to mine Bitcoin using a personal computer. But now, mining demands extensive electricity and hardware, which impacts the speed of mining. Consequently, if you’re mining independently, it could take longer than the ideal 10 minutes.

The Role of Mining Hardware and Competition

Mining hardware plays a critical role in Bitcoin mining. The equipment is necessary to solve complex cryptographic problems that secure the blockchain and process transactions.

As technology has advanced, CPUs, once capable of handling Bitcoin mining, have been replaced by more powerful devices such as ASIC machines. These machines are designed specifically for mining Bitcoin and are significantly more efficient and robust.

Bitcoin Mining: How Long Does It Take to Mine 1 Bitcoin?

The development of these modern mining rigs has exponentially increased the competition in Bitcoin mining. This is because the rigs expedite the Bitcoin mining process, making it difficult for solo miners with less powerful equipment to compete.

The ASIC machines used today are far more powerful and energy-efficient than the CPUs and GPUs that preceded them. They continually gain more hashing power as new, more advanced chips are developed and deployed, further intensifying the competition.

However, the cost of these powerful machines can be prohibitive, leading to a competitive landscape where only those willing to invest a significant amount can mine efficiently.

How Are Bitcoins Mined?

Bitcoins are mined through a process that involves the cryptographic hash algorithm known as “Secure Hash Algorithm 256 (SHA-256).” This algorithm transforms any line of text into a 256-bit (32-byte) hash value, converting words and sentences into fixed-length, uninterpretable, alphanumeric strings.

These strings serve a crucial role in bitcoin mining as they act as the digital signature for every bitcoin block and transaction recorded.

SHA-256 is specifically used to hash the block’s header and create bitcoin payment addresses. Other computers that can recognize hash algorithms then verify the resulting cryptographic string. The output from the original data will always be consistent.

The entire process of hashing is essentially an attempt to guess the target hash assigned to a block. It does this by combining the block’s contents with random values known as the nonce.

If the output doesn’t match the target hash, the process moves to the next computation. For a block to be accepted as valid, the final hash output, processed by the SHA-256 algorithm, must be less than or equal to the target hash.

How Much Does It Cost to Mine One Bitcoin?

The expense of mining a single Bitcoin varies, and according to CoinGecko, the average cost is roughly $70,291.24 at the moment. This cost depends on numerous factors, with the energy price in the mining region being a major consideration.

For instance, the cost can be influenced by your electricity rate and the type of mining machine you employ. Using the latest mining computers at home can result in high mining costs.

Several elements must be considered when calculating the cost of mining one Bitcoin. These include the mining hardware’s efficiency (in watts per terahash), the mining operation’s hash rate (in terahashes per second), and the total energy consumed over the time it takes to mine one Bitcoin.

However, a simple method involves using the average energy needed to mine one Bitcoin and then computing the cost based on the electricity rate. Here’s the formula:

  • At 10 cents per kWh:
    • Cost = 110,000 kWh × 0.10 $ per kWh
  • At 4.7 cents per kWh:
    • Cost = 110,000 kWh × 0.047 $ per kWh

Thus, the cost of mining one Bitcoin at an electricity rate of 10 cents per kWh is roughly $11,000, and at 4.7 cents per kWh, it’s about $5,170.

How Much Power Is Needed to Mine 1 Bitcoin a Day?

Estimating the power required to mine 1 Bitcoin per day, we can use a Bitcoin mining calculator. This suggests that around 502,000 TH/s of computing capacity is needed. This amounts to about 1,968.6 units of Bitmain Antminer S19 XP Hyd (255Th).

Bitcoin Mining: How Long Does It Take to Mine 1 Bitcoin?

Considering that each of these ASICs consumes 5,304W, the total power consumption for this setup would be approximately 10,441,600W (10.4416MW).

Mining metrics calculations are based on a network hash rate of 650,165,337,340 GH/s and a BTC-USD exchange rate of 1 BTC = $ 69,215.33, subject to fluctuation. The current block reward is 6.25 BTC, with an average block time of 587.4247 seconds as of this writing.

The cost of electricity is $0.12 per kWh. Future changes in block rewards and hash rates are not considered. These are estimations under current conditions.

How Long Does It Take to Mine 1 Bitcoin Using a PC?

Mining 1 Bitcoin using a PC would roughly take about 2 million years, assuming the system can achieve a mining speed of 500 MH/s in a Bitcoin mining pool with stable network conditions.

This is due to the average block generation time for Bitcoin being 10 minutes, and the current block reward standing at 6.25 BTC.

If you were to use a high-performance gaming computer for mining, and manage to achieve 500 MH/s, you could potentially earn 0.00000058 BTC per year under ideal circumstances.

However, with block rewards continually halving, and mining difficulty increasing, it’s practically impossible to mine 1 Bitcoin using a PC.

How Many Bitcoins Are Left to Mine?

Currently, the number of Bitcoins (BTC) left to be mined is around 1,321,700, suggesting that close to 19,6 million are already in circulation.

Bitcoin Mining: How Long Does It Take to Mine 1 Bitcoin?
Source: BitBo

What Happens After All the Bitcoins Have Been Mined?

When the cap of 21 million Bitcoin is hit, no new BTC will be issued, even if the number of available coins falls slightly short of this cap.

Nonetheless, the verification of Bitcoin transactions and their grouping into blocks will persist, with miners still receiving compensation primarily through transaction processing fees.

What happens to miners when Bitcoin reaches its maximum supply will hinge on how the cryptocurrency evolves.

If the Bitcoin blockchain is still processing a significant volume of transactions in 2140, miners could potentially sustain revenue through transaction fees.

Conversely, if Bitcoin is primarily being utilized as a value reserve rather than for everyday transactions, miners could maintain profitability by levying high fees to process large or high-value transactions.

Is Bitcoin Mining Profitable in 2024?

Bitcoin mining profitability in 2024 largely depends on a variety of factors including the cost of mining equipment, electricity costs, the price of Bitcoin, and mining difficulty.

Factors Affecting Bitcoin Mining Profitability in 2024

Miners compete against large outfits controlling vast capacities, over 100 exa-hashes per second, which dwarfs the typical graphic processing unit’s approximately 275 mega-hashes per second.

Profitability increases when joining a mining pool, as rewards are based on the contribution to the mining effort. However, consideration must also be given to the initial investment into ASICs, powerful Bitcoin mining equipment that can cost thousands of dollars.

Impact of ‘Bitcoin Halving’ Event on Mining Rewards

Moreover, Bitcoin mining rewards are set to decrease due to the upcoming ‘Bitcoin Halving’ event in April 2024, reducing the reward from 6.25 BTC to 3.125 BTC. This reduction could impact profitability, particularly if the price of Bitcoin does not increase accordingly.

At current prices, 6.25 BTC equates to approximately $433,400. Following the halving, if prices remain constant, the reward value would halve to around $216,700. Miners must then cover operational costs such as equipment, electricity, staff, and taxes from this amount.

Conclusion

In conclusion, Bitcoin mining is a complex process that involves solving cryptographic problems to secure the blockchain and process transactions. The time it takes to mine one Bitcoin greatly depends on a myriad of factors, including computational power, competition, and the type of mining equipment used.

With advancing technology and increased competition, mining Bitcoin has become less accessible to individual miners. Moreover, Bitcoin mining’s profitability in the future will hinge on several elements such as the cost of mining equipment, electricity costs, the price of Bitcoin, and mining difficulty.

Thus, potential miners should meticulously consider the return on investment before embarking on Bitcoin mining.

FAQs

1. How Long Does It Take to Mine 1 Bitcoin Using a Smartphone?

Mining Bitcoin using a smartphone is not feasible due to the high computational power required for Bitcoin mining. Even the most advanced smartphones don’t have the necessary computing power to compete with specialized mining equipment like ASICs.

Therefore, it would take an inordinately long time, potentially many years or even decades, to mine a single Bitcoin using a smartphone, if it’s even possible.

2. Why Do Bitcoins Need to Be Mined?

Bitcoins need to be mined for a number of reasons. Firstly, mining is the process by which new bitcoins are introduced into the circulating supply.

Secondly, mining is also the mechanism that secures the Bitcoin network. By solving complex mathematical problems, miners validate and record transactions on the Bitcoin blockchain, preventing double-spending and maintaining the integrity of the system.

3. Can You Mine for Bitcoins without the Right Equipment?

Yes, it is possible to mine bitcoins without investing in dedicated hardware through a process known as “cloud mining.” This method is an alternative for those who do not have their own mining infrastructure.

Cloud mining leverages a remote data center managed by a third-party mining facility. Users only need to rent a virtual server where they can install their mining software. They also have the option to buy a membership contract or share in a cloud-mining farm with others.

4. How Will Bitcoin Halving Affect Bitcoin Gains?

The Bitcoin halving event is expected to significantly impact Bitcoin gains. According to the Forbes Finance Council, this event will trigger a recalibration of Bitcoin prices. Two primary outcomes are predicted:

  • Some miners may choose to exit as the reward for Bitcoin mining will decrease by half.
  • Miners may decide to retain their Bitcoins, much like holding onto stocks, and wait for a favorable selling price.

Past halving events have elicited similar reactions from miners, and it’s anticipated that the upcoming halving will follow the same pattern.

The next halving event, expected in April 2024, will decrease the reward from 6.25 Bitcoin to 3.125 Bitcoin per mined block.

5. What Factors Bring Cryptos Down?

Factors such as political events, regulatory changes, economic policies, and global crises can significantly impact the value of cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin.

For instance, when China, a popular destination for Bitcoin mining due to its low electricity costs, banned the activity in 2019, Bitcoin’s price took a hit. This led many miners to relocate their operations to countries like Kazakhstan, which had ample energy resources.

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